Experimental Study for Strength Capacity of Cold-Formed Steel Joists Connections with Consideration of Various Bolts Arrangements

Document Type: Regular Paper

Authors

1 Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Science and Culture, Tehran, Iran

2 Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Science and Culture, Tehran, Iran

3 Assistant Professor, Qazvin Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin, Iran, and Formerly PhD of Structural Engineering. Auburn University, USA

4 Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Science and Culture, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

With growth the construction technologies, Cold-Formed Steel, CFS, sections are widely used in ordinary steel buildings because of some advantages such as light weight, ease of installation, decrease in cost, and increase in speed of operation. Using the bolted connections for CFS joist is one of the best details for steel structures.  The main objective of this study is to conduct an experimental research to evaluate the load carrying capacity of bolted connections based on various bolts arrangement. Ten full scale joist-beam connections are tested under the incremental gravity load. The variable parameters are the arrangement of bolts, and thickness of CFS sheets. The joist sections made of two C-shaped, which are back-to-back connected using self-drilling screw bolts in the web. The arrangement of bolts connection and steel sheet thickness are considered as two major factors to improve the load carrying capacity. Base on the obtained results, it was observed that increasing the number of the bolts and their spacing from the neutral axes led to the additional load carrying capacity. Furthermore, it can be concluded that the thickness of CFS sheets play an effective role for load carrying capacity of connections.

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